Omensight - PS4 Review


Set in a world that is facing its end, Omensight finds in you in the role of the Harbinger, a mythical entity that shows itself when the world Urralia is in dire peril. In an action-filled detective story that, while repetitive, makes clever use of time travel and most importantly, respects the player's time. With gorgeous graphics, fast-paced tactical gameplay, and lightweight RPG elements, Omensight is a must buy.

Like any self-respecting gamer, I hate backtracking, so when I first realized Omensight was a title almost exclusively surrounding backtracking I groaned. Loudly. But I gave it a chance and I am glad that I did as Omensight is among the best dozen or so hours I have spent in a game recently. In truth I was a little bummed when the end came about, as I wanted more; when the credits finally roll, they will do so leaving you both fulfilled and wanting to give it another go.

I for one aim to wait a bit to let the story fade from my memory a bit, then plan to hit it another time or three to see what differences your choices make. I honestly cannot remember the last time I felt that way about a game given the fact that the two primary franchises where choice supposedly mattered, Dragon Age and Mass Effect, had some relatively abysmal offerings in Andromeda and Inquisition with regard to "choice." Omensight may actually scratch that itch pretty darn well …


As the ominous-sounding 'Harbinger,' who is a sign of the end times, it is up to you to right the wrongs that lead the world to the brink of destruction. Taking place over the course of a few days, Omensight will find you moving forward and back in time as you follow the decisions of a few of the primary characters in Urralia. What I found pleasantly surprising is that it was not easy to pick out the culprit early on as there is intrigue galore happening throughout the primary characters and there are a great many false-trails or interconnecting events that shed light (or shadow) on the overall situation.

More often than not, Omensight feels more like a supernatural fantasy detective game and less like an action-packed hack-and-slash. Few moments are ever dull, and the ability to skip to important points in the timeline is a welcome feature, though I did find myself regularly repeating sections in an attempt to work closer to a Platinum trophy; regardless, the respect for the player's time is abundantly clear and I cannot thank the good folks at Spearhead Games enough for their including an ability to skip to the important and juicy parts.



The primary downfall to Omensight is that it is just too short; while the 9 - 10 hour campaign is excellent, it does leave you itching for something more or something deeper. In retrospect though, that is generally the mark of an excellent title, be it a book, movie, or video game. When you have an audience clambering for more, you extend the possibility of furthering the storyline / franchise as they would gobble up any future releases. I myself would easily buy into an episodic-style Omensight game focused on small, seemingly random events that tied together into a large more complicated event. There is room for it in the lore within the game, as there is a lot of potential for a prequel to Omensight based on the lore found within the game. I know it is senseless rambling, but when world and character building is done as well as this, I cannot help but want for more.


Though the combat and in-game puzzles are none too deep, they are richly populated and fantastically presented in Omensight, and wrapped up in the gorgeous darkly cartoony aesthetic creates a must-have cult hit for any budding PlayStation fan. While it may be completable in a single playthrough, the time spent as the Harbinger will be an excellent one that will ultimately leave you satisfied and at about $20 USD, it is an absolute must-buy.

Game Information

Platform:
Sony PlayStation 4
Developer(s):
Spearhead Games
Publisher(s):
Spearhead Games
Genre(s):
Action
Adventure
Mode(s):
Single Player
Other Platform(s):
PC

Source:
Provided by Publisher




Article by Robert
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