Games of the Year 2021 - Game of the Year


Reaching the end of the line of our Games of the Year 2021, we are happy to present to you each of our Game of the Year choices.


Pierre-Yves: ENDER LILIES: Quietus of the Knights


I could say so much about ENDER LILIES: Quietus of the Knights but I already have from the below review to the preview that came before it. Artistically, it was a pleasure to look at. Musically, it was phenomenal where every area not only had its own various musical scores, but bosses not only each had their own, but they also had two where one could rise into the other before falling back down once the battles were over. Gameplay was stellar and I loved the evolution from beginning to the true end as you pick up new spirits and integrate them into your strategies.

If there's one title from 2021 that I think you should play if you haven't already? It would be this one as it's a Metroidvania that keeps on giving all the way to the ending credits.

Check out our full review of ENDER LILIES: Quietus of the Knights by developers Live Wire, adglobe and publisher Binary Haze Interactive for the PC (Steam).

Richard: Monster Hunter Rise

Admittedly I may be a little biased here, as I'm a huge Monster Hunter fan, but to see the amazing quality of life improvements, the little tweaks and changes from the older style, the fact the hunting horn is a viable option for casual players, as well as the cool wirebug stuff going on, this game hooked me in from the beginning.. The special moves, raid battles, and doggo transport were all wonderful additions. While it's by no means perfect, it's definitely at the top of my list for games I've reviewed this year.

Check out our full review of Monster Hunter Rise by developer and publisher Capcom for the Nintendo Switch.

Susan N.: Sherlock Holmes: Chapter One


Frogwares is the ultimate detective in their ability to find the right combination of gameplay elements that make a title enjoyable. They developed an open-world Sherlock Holmes game that contains different paths players could take. Not only did they expand upon the abilities that Sherlock could have in his younger years, but they also overhauled the combat system into one that fit the character. Despite that fact, they allowed players to skip the combat altogether if they wanted to focus on the investigation and intrigue of the story. Additionally, the studio did a brilliant job of livening up the story with excellent wit and a wonderfully crafted atmosphere. Considering that I had been looking forward to this title for a long time, I was not disappointed in the outcome. In 2021, nothing beats Sherlock Holmes Chapter One for me.

Check out our full review of Sherlock Holmes Chapter One by developer and publisher Frogwares for the PC (Steam).

Nick: Guilty Gear -Strive-

This is fighting at its best. It’s fast, it’s flashy, it’s accessible yet it rewards patience and dedication to improving with your preferred characters as well. The rocking soundtrack is the kind of OST I can gleefully listen to without playing the game itself, but it compliments the action and smooth visuals to perfection during gameplay as well. 

Check out our full review of Guilty Gear -Strive- by developer and publisher Arc System Works for the Sony PlayStation 5.

Robert: Star Citizen


Sure, we can technically say, “but wait! That’s not a game, that’s a tech demo!” and you’d not be entirely wrong, but this is my list and Star Citizen belongs here for the very simple truth that, as a ‘game-as-a-service,’ Star Citizen is exceptionally successful (as proven by Star Citizen having raised over $400M from crowd-funding) and is growing more successful with each quarter that passes.

Well over 100-ships currently in game and designed to a degree not seen in other video games, well beyond a dozen unique planets/moons, all with their own unique biomes, one of which is a massive ecumenopolis, hundreds of items, from lethal to non-lethal weapons, food and drink (which you need to consume to survive), and a massive, growing, and passionate community …

Star Citizen is without a doubt, a “game;” it’s just not a traditional one.


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